Tabloid

What write press

Moderátori: Brandon, Správci

Jana

Tabloid

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 19 Máj 2008, 11:00

Tony winner eliminated in 'Dancing' semifinal

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Tony Award winner Marissa Jaret Winokur won't be adding a mirrorball trophy to her collection of prizes -- the actress was eliminated Tuesday from "Dancing With the Stars."

She and her professional partner, Tony Dovolani, came into the semifinal results show in last place, with 52 points out of 60. The couple divided the judges Monday with their quickstep and rumba, earning 26 points for each performance.

Judges' scores are combined with viewer votes to determine which couple is eliminated each week.

Winokur, who has worn a glowing smile throughout the competition, kept grinning even after she learned her fate.

"I've never felt sexier in my life. Just going through this ride, I feel like I can pretty much do anything," said the full-figured Winokur, adding that she "wanted to prove to people that you don't have to be a size zero to dance."

"I want everyone to go out and do something fun," she said as the credits rolled on the ABC dance-off. "Do something that makes you feel sexy and shake what your mama gave you."

Tuesday's show also featured a tribute to Michael Jackson's "Thriller," with Omarion singing a medley of hits from the 1980s album as dozens of dancers performed some of Jackson's signature moves.

The show's tiniest competitors, the ballroom kids, also returned to the dance floor. One of three preteen couples will be crowned junior champions during next week's season finale.

Usher is set to perform on the final show, as are the celebrity dancers who've been eliminated during this season's competition: Mario, Marlee Matlin, Priscilla Presley, Adam Carolla, Steve Guttenberg, Monica Seles and Penn Jillette.

Finalists Jason Taylor, Kristi Yamaguchi and Cristian de la Fuente will do their last dances Monday, and one will be named season champ on Tuesday.

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 21 Máj 2008, 06:48

Judge rejects new trial in Michael Jackson taping case

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A judge on Monday denied a new trial for a Santa Monica-based air charter service that was ordered to pay $20.25 million for secretly videotaping Michael Jackson and his lawyers as they flew to the pop star's surrender on molestation charges in 2003.


A new trial is denied for a group that was ordered to pay millions for secretly videotaping Michael Jackson in 2003.

Superior Court Judge Soussan G. Bruguera rejected the motion by the now-defunct company XtraJet Inc. and its owner Jeffrey Borer.

In March, Bruguera ordered XtraJet to pay the $20.25 million to Jackson's lawyer, Mark Geragos, and his associate, Pat Harris, for invading their privacy in order to sell the video of Jackson to the media. The pop star was a plaintiff in the 2003 lawsuit, but later withdrew from the case.

Borer and his associate Arvel Jetter Reeves, the mechanic who installed cameras in the plane, pleaded guilty to conspiracy last year. Borer was sentenced to six months home detention so he could care for his ailing wife, while Reeves received an eight-month prison sentence.

Borer's lawyer, Lloyd Kirschbaum, said he would appeal the compensatory and punitive awards.

Kirschbaum said the judge ignored crucial evidence in favor of his client because she mistakenly believed that the tape included sound.

Without audio captured on the tape, Geragos and Harris could not claim a breach of the attorney-client privilege, Kirschbaum argued.

He also said the plaintiff won't be able to collect from XtraJet because the company is bankrupt.

"It's like trying to get money from Enron," Kirschbaum said.

Geragos' attorney, Brian Kabateck, praised the decision. He said Kirschbaum's motion raised the same issues the defense had argued unsuccessfully before.

Even if the tape, which is in the hands of the FBI, had no audio on it when obtained by authorities, the intention was to record conversations, said Kabateck.

Užívateľov profilový obrázok
Braňo
King of pop (7/8)
Príspevky: 1569
Dátum registrácie: 30 Jan 2007, 16:57

Príspevokod užívateľa Braňo » 25 Máj 2008, 23:58

Obrázok

Obrázok
Obrázok

Obrázok

Obrázok

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 26 Máj 2008, 20:59

It was a rare public appearance for reclusive Michael Jackson tonight (SAT), in the middle of 18,000 Ultimate Fighting Championship fans at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

“You don’t normally see him at an event like this,” I was told. “Then for him to put himself in the middle of a crowded arena is really unusual.”

It was an all-star turnout for the UFC showdowns, with retired porn queen Jenna Jameson rooting for boyfriend Tito Ortiz alongside Celebrity Apprentice host Donald Trump and Donald Trump Jr. Also there Shaquille O’Neal, Mandy Moore, Laura Prepon, and Jamie Pressley.

All the attention though was focused on the pop-music king. With a new single coming out mid-June Michael is expected to be seen out and about more often at upcoming public events, I was informed.

Source: LasVegasMagazine

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 13 Júl 2008, 20:10

Ex-trooper to face trial in civil rights shooting

MONTGOMERY, Alabama (AP) -- A former Alabama state trooper is scheduled to go on trial in October for a slaying that occurred on darkened streets during a historic civil rights demonstration in Marion, Alabama in 1965.

Circuit Judge Tommy Jones declined to dismiss an indictment against former trooper James Bonard Fowler and scheduled his trial for the week of October 20.

"We look forward to having this matter resolved after 43 years," District Attorney Michael Jackson said Thursday.

A Perry County grand jury indicted Fowler on May 9, 2007, on first-degree and second-degree murder charges involving the shooting death of Jimmie Lee Jackson.

Fowler's attorney, George Beck, had asked the judge to dismiss the charges because of the passage of time and the death of defense witnesses, but the judge declined.

Jackson, a 26-year-old black man, was shot by the white trooper during a civil rights protest in the west Alabama town on February 18, 1965. Jackson died eight days later at a Selma hospital.

The shooting happened after street lights went out during a nighttime civil rights march and violence erupted. Civil rights museums in Alabama say Jackson was shot trying to stop state troopers from beating his grandfather and mother. Fowler maintains he shot in self-defense after Jackson hit him with a drink bottle and tried to grab his gun.

Fowler's defense wants the trial moved from west Alabama because signs and historic markers in Perry County portray Jackson as a martyr of the civil rights movement. Beck argued that the shooting was self-defense and that his 74-year-old client couldn't get a fair trial in the county where it occurred.

The judge declined to rule on moving the trial until jurors are questioned in October, and the district attorney said court officials will call a larger-than-normal pool of potential jurors.

"Mr. Fowler continues to believe he cannot get a fair trial in Perry County. He feels what he did was justified under the circumstances, and he feels if he can get an fair and impartial jury, he will be acquitted," Beck said Thursday.

Jackson's shooting prompted civil rights activists to set out on a Selma-to-Montgomery march, which was turned back at Selma by club-wielding troopers and deputies in what became known as "Bloody Sunday." A later march, led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., made it all the way to the Alabama Capitol and led Congress to pass the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which allowed millions of Southern blacks to register to vote.

A federal grand jury in Mobile reviewed the shooting shortly after it occurred and brought no charges. Michael Jackson reopened the investigation after he became Perry County's first black district attorney in 2005.

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 07 Aug 2008, 08:48

Lisa Marie Presley expecting twins

YORK (AP) -- Lisa Marie Presley is expecting twins, her spokeswoman, Cindy Guagenti, said Wednesday.


Presley -- daughter of Elvis Presley and actress Priscilla Presley -- announced her pregnancy on her MySpace page in March, saying she was forced to go public with the news after photos of her looking heavier were ridiculed in the media.

The 40-year-old singer has two children from her marriage to musician Danny Keough, which ended in 1994. She was briefly married to Michael Jackson and Nicolas Cage.

Presley married music producer Michael Lockwood in January 2006.

"It's her time to celebrate with her husband," Priscilla Presley said Tuesday in an interview with "Entertainment Tonight." "My daughter is a very family girl. She loves children, and I know that she and Michael have been hoping for this for a long time."

She said twins run in the family "on Elvis' side and on my side too. I have twin brothers, and then, of course, Elvis had a twin brother (who died at birth)."

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 02 Sep 2008, 14:03

Jackson celebrates 50th with cake and cartoons

NEW YORK (AP) -- Michael Jackson celebrated his 50th birthday Friday, but he's still young at heart.

"I'll just have a little cake with my children and we'll probably watch some cartoons," the pop star said in an interview with ABC News' "Good Morning America." Jackson talked by phone with ABC on Thursday.

Jackson, a twice-divorced father of three, said he aims to provide a normal life for his children.

"I am letting them enjoy their childhood as much as possible. ... I let them go to the arcade and go to the movies and do things. I think that comes naturally. I want them to get to do things I didn't get to do," he said.

"I get pretty emotional when I see them having a wonderful time," he said.

As for his career, Jackson said he's "looking forward to doing a lot of great things. ... I think the best is yet to come in my true humble opinion."

He said recording the blockbuster albums "Thriller" and "Off the Wall" were the happiest times of his life.

"That meant very much to me and seemed to be received so beautifully by the public and the world. You know, I enjoyed it very much," he said.

Jackson was asked if he had received a card from AARP, which focuses on the needs and concerns of those 50 and older.

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 02 Sep 2008, 14:05

Star Trek: The Experience closing down

LAS VEGAS, Nevada (AP) -- After a decade at the final frontier, Star Trek: The Experience is going where no Las Vegas Strip attraction wants to go.

With a decommissioning ceremony -- as befits any great vessel -- the exhibit and its replica of the starship Enterprise are closing Monday.

Thousands of trekkies are "beaming up" from across the United Federation of Planets, er, the United States and around the world one last time, according to exhibit spokesman Chad Boutte.

Some seek a final encounter with the Borg, the television show's race of organic robot aliens who tell everyone "resistance is futile." Others just want to share a farewell drink -- likely a stiff Warp Core Breach, with 10 ounces of rum -- with fellow fans at the attraction's restaurant.

Employees dressed as aliens discuss the minutiae of their worlds' mythologies with visitors who learn, in typically circular trekkie logic, that the exhibit is a "time station" for transporting researchers and equipment between the 21st and 24th centuries.

For $49.99, fans can enjoy two virtual rides and the Museum of the Future, with costumes, "phasers" and Mr. Spock's coffin. More than 3 million people have come through since the Experience opened in 1998.

In the end, the frontier the USS Enterprise couldn't breach was earthly: The attraction's owner, Cedar Fair Entertainment Co., and the Las Vegas Hilton, its landlord, couldn't agree on a new lease. They worked as a typical landlord and retail tenant, with Cedar Fair keeping all revenue from the attraction, said hotel spokesman Ira David Sternberg.

Trekkies are incensed. They've scrawled reminiscences about the exhibit on the walls inside, and they're calling Cedar Fair and the hotel to complain. But their online rumor that the space the exhibit occupies will become a theater for pop star Michael Jackson is unfounded, Sternberg said. He said nothing's decided.

Karen and Eric Klein, from Easton, Pennsylvania, had planned to renew their wedding vows at the Experience on their 10th anniversary but came this week instead, four years early.

A Federation captain told them during the ceremony on the bridge of the Enterprise that the energy between them created their love.

"He had his own schtick, and it was very beautiful, and it actually made the moment even that much better," said Eric Klein, 39, still holding his wife's hand outside the gift shop. "It wasn't simply being on the bridge, it really felt very emotional."

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 06 Nov 2008, 19:01

[url]Quincy Jones: The beat goes on[/url]

CNN) -- It's difficult to overestimate Quincy Jones's contribution to American music. Over the last 60 years he has excelled as a musician, composer, record producer, arranger, conductor and media company executive.

In a career studded with landmarks, Jones produced Michael Jackson's multi-platinum albums "Off The Wall," "Bad" and "Thriller" -- the best selling album of all time -- and produced and conducted "We Are The World," one of the biggest-selling singles in history.

Quincy Delight Jones Jr., known to his friends as "Q," was born on March 14, 1933, in Chicago. He moved to Seattle as a child and began playing trumpet aged 12. When he was 14 he befriended a young Ray Charles, who taught him how to arrange music, and Jones was soon playing bebop in nightclubs, backing up the likes of Billie Holiday.

In 1951, Jones won a music scholarship at prestigious Schillinger House, in Boston, but he abandoned his studies to tour with bandleader Lionel Hampton. By the mid-50s, he was arranging and recording for the likes of Sarah Vaughan, Duke Ellington and his old friend Ray Charles. In 1956 he toured with Dizzy Gillespie's Big Band, recording his first album as a leader in the same year.

In 1957, Jones moved to Paris to study music composition and theory, taking a job with Mercury Records' French distributor to pay for his studies. After a European tour proved a financial disaster, the president of Mercury offered him a position at the record label and Jones soon became vice-president at the company.

In the 60s, Jones worked as a conductor and arranger for Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald. He also began scoring music for films, including "In the Heat of the Night," "In Cold Blood" and "The Pawnbroker," which featured his hit "Soul Bossa Nova," later re-used as the theme to the "Austin Powers" movies.

Jones would go on to score 33 movies during his career and he also composed the themes for TV shows such as "Ironside," "The Bill Cosby Show" and "Roots," which earned him an Emmy award. Having made his name as a composer and arranger in the 70s, he moved away from jazz to record a series of hit albums of his own soulful music. See photos of Quincy in Seattle »

Jones's career was dramatically put on hold in 1974, when he suffered a severe aneurysm, but it did little to stall his incredible drive. In the 80s, as well as producing three Michael Jackson albums and "We are the World," he co-produced and scored the Steven Spielberg movie "The Color Purple," and formed multi-media company Quincy Jones Entertainment. In his role as CEO he was executive producer of TV series "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" and published "Vibe" and "SPIN" magazines.

His 1989 album "Back On The Block" won Album Of The Year at the Grammys and 1993's "Miles and Quincy Live At Montreux", featuring Jones conducting Miles Davis, earned another Grammy. All in all, Jones has won 27 Grammys, been nominated for seven Academy Awards, and has added to his business interests with Quincy Jones Media Group and Qwest Broadcasting.

Perhaps because of his own upbringing in tough neighborhoods in Chicago and Seattle, Jones has long been involved in social activism. He supported Martin Luther King's Operation Breadbasket, which promoted economic development in the inner cities, and worked on Reverend Jesse Jackson's People United to Save Humanity project.

Jones founded the Listen Up! Foundation, which has worked on youth projects in Los Angeles and South Africa, and he helped launch the We Are the Future project, which helps children in poor and conflict-ridden areas. He is also one of the founders of the Institute for Black American Music (IBAM), which raises money to establish a national library of African-American art and music.


Over the course of his incredible career, Jones somehow found the time to marry three times and father seven children. In 1990, his life was chronicled in the movie "Listen Up: The Lives of Quincy Jones" and in 2001, Jones published "Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones." Watch Quincy Jones on My City_My Life »

Of his own career, which has taken him from being a teenage musician in the clubs of Seattle to a world-famous music mogul, Jones says, "You have to turn all of your drunken dreams into sober realizations. I think I was blessed with the ability to see things and make them happen before everybody else saw them."

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 06 Nov 2008, 19:05

Quincy Jones: Science and soul

SEATTLE, Washington (CNN) -- Quincy Jones moved to Seattle as a child and discovered a passion for music that would bring him global success as a musician, composer and producer. He talks to CNN about music, working with Michael Jackson, and the city he grew up in.

CNN: How would you describe Seattle?

Quincy Jones: Seattle is like a global gumbo, a melting pot with all kinds of people -- the rich, the poor, white people, some Chinese, Filipino, Jewish and black people -- they're all here.

CNN: What was it like when you first arrived in the city?

Quincy Jones: It was diametrically opposite to where I'd come from. I was born into a black ghetto in Chicago, during the depression. Where we came from, there were machine guns, there were gangsters everywhere.

At 11 years old we broke into a building to get some lemon meringue pie. As we were leaving, I spotted a splendid piano in the corner. I put my hands on the piano and somehow every cell in the body, everything in me knew that's what I would be doing for the rest of my life. It's just astounding. That moment changed my life.

CNN: Why is revisiting your old high school in Seattle important to you?

Quincy Jones: It's easier to get to where you think you want to go if you know where you come from. The diversity here in the 1940s was awesome. As a kid, education is what provides you with a foundation.

This is one of the greatest high schools America has ever seen. Garfield [High School] makes my heart and soul smile. It's astounding the people that came out of this place --Jimi Hendrix and Bruce Lee went to school here. Everyone keeps saying, "What's in the water?"

CNN: Your remarkable career started here in Seattle...

Quincy Jones: I always wanted to be a trumpet player. By the time I got to Garfield [High School] I was starting to be pretty good. I was in all the bands at the school -- concert bands, dance bands, the gospel bands. Back then, Ray Charles and I used to pretend we were older than we were so that we could sneak into the jazz clubs around the city. Later we started playing in nightclubs; it was brilliant.

CNN: You are, arguably, best known for producing Michael Jackson. How did that come about?

Quincy Jones: When I was a musical director we were working together on a film project. He asked me to help him find a producer for his first solo album. Watching him was incredible. He would learn everybody else's parts -- the dialogues, the songs, the dance steps -- and I saw something in him. I saw a part of him that had never been exposed before. We went all the way to Michael's soul at that time and it was am amazing experience.

CNN: You're also credited with discovering the talk-show host Oprah Winfrey for the film "The Color Purple", which you co-produced with Steven Spielberg.

Quincy Jones: I was watching television one morning and I saw this lady on a Chicago station. I thought that if she could sing and act then she is who we're looking for.

One thing led to another and Oprah came in for a screen test. You know the rest. She's a lady who is touched by God -- such an incredible woman. Whoopi (Goldberg) is the same. It was a great experience, as a producer, doing my first film with Spielberg. I was glad that I had all of that wonderful family to work with.

CNN: Tell us about recording the song "We are the World" in 1985 to raise money for the famine in Ethiopia.

Quincy Jones: Lionel Richie (who co-wrote the song with Michael Jackson) called and asked me to be involved in a project to help Africa. I guess they wanted somebody who was crazy enough to work with lots of different people. Everybody flocked to record this song, including Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Bruce Springsteen, Dan Aykroyd, Bob Geldof...

CNN: You've often said that music gave you your freedom, how is that?

Quincy Jones: Music to me, at that time became a passion. It was even deeper than that because we had a strange family background. My mother was in the mental institution since I was seven, with dementia. Things weren't working out in the family sense. I didn't know my mother so I made a pact with my soul and said if I don't have one I don't need one, and I made music my mother.

Probably if I had a great family I would have been a pitiful musician, you never know. Music became my mother and it was a passion -- a total passion.

CNN: What's your approach to life?

Quincy Jones: I'm always prepared and I mix science with the soul. You do whatever it takes to get that balance. You have to turn all of your drunken dreams into sober realizations.

I think I was blessed with the ability to see things and make them happen before everybody else saw them -- whether it's with Oprah or Michael or Will Smith, who I also discovered (for the television program "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air"). You have to believe and trust yourself.


CNN: You have achieved remarkable success, yet you are very humble. What will your legacy be?

Quincy Jones: I hope that on my tombstone it says "Born 1933, died 2043". I hope that's my legacy.

Jana

Príspevokod užívateľa Jana » 18 Nov 2008, 14:59

Sheikh seeks millions from Michael Jackson

LONDON, England (AP) -- The son of an Arab monarch is taking the King of Pop to court over an album and an autobiography Michael Jackson was allegedly paid for but never produced.

Sheikh Abdulla bin Hamad Al Khalifa is seeking $7 million from the embattled singer at London's Royal Courts of Justice.

Lawyers for Al Khalifa say the money was intended as an advance on a joint recording project. Jackson, however, claims the cash was a gift.

David Sherborne, representing Al Khalifa, says the case would mainly hinge on the nature of Jackson's friendship with the sheikh.

Jackson was not in court as the trial opened Monday.

Jackson's finances fell apart following his arrest in 2003 on charges that he molested a 13-year old boy at Neverland. He moved to Bahrain after being acquitted.

Užívateľov profilový obrázok
joanam
Stranger in Moscow (2/8)
Príspevky: 79
Dátum registrácie: 01 Feb 2009, 07:38

Príspevokod užívateľa joanam » 05 Feb 2009, 12:37

Director sues Jackson over 'Thriller' profits

(CNN) -- Movie director John Landis is suing Michael Jackson, accusing the reclusive entertainer of fraud in his handling of profits from the iconic "Thriller" video the two made together more than 25 years ago.


"King of Pop" Michael Jackson, seen in 2005, made the "Thriller" video with John Landis more than 25 years ago.
1 of 2 Landis claimed his 1983 contract with Jackson gave him 50 percent of net profits from the 14-minute video and the documentary about the making of it, both works that he directed and co-wrote with Jackson, court documents say.

Jackson "wrongfully refused to pay or account for such profits," the suit, filed against the singer and Optimum Productions, says. The suit characterizes Optimum as "a defunct corporation" Jackson has used as an alter ego.

The suit accuses Jackson of "concealing the extent of net profits" by not giving an annual accounting for at least the past four years, and maintains that Jackson is "guilty of fraudulent, malicious and oppressive conduct."

Jackson's lawyers have not responded to the suit, which was filed on January 21.

The video was based on Jackson's 1982 album by the same name, one of the top-selling of all time.

Landis, best known as director of "Animal House" and "An American Werewolf in London," made the song into a short horror movie, complete with Vincent Price adding narration.

Word of the suit comes just after an announcement that Jackson has signed a deal to take the dancing zombie story to the Broadway stage.

The Nederlander Organization, a Broadway production company, announced Tuesday that it had signed a contract with Jackson to produce "Thriller" on stage. The show, which Jackson is to be involved with, also is to include music from other Jackson albums, the company said.

The court has set May 11 as the date for lawyers to hold a conference with a judge concerning the lawsuit.


Návrat na "A bit tabloid"

Kto je prítomný

Užívatelia prezerajúci toto fórum: Žiadny pripojení užívatelia a 1 neregistrovaný